On the Need to Have Opinions and Be Politically Correct

What keeps social media going? Sure, you want to know what your friends are up to. But it is also a space to build an identity and express one’s opinions. If we’re addicted to all kinds of information, we’re also addicted to responding to that information. In fact, the whole of Internet is based on this social contract of uploading, finding and responding to all kinds of information. But the appeal of social media is that your responses are in one place. Your opinions are out there for everyone you have added on your social media (or the world, depending on your privacy settings); think about that— that’s probably 100 times more than those people you would actually talk to in person, about these same opinions. There are people, who might never EVER know what you think of the latest Leonardo Caprio movie or of that weird comment by a hairy guru, if you did not post it on Facebook. Our need to respond thus, creates an Internet persona, and this leads to three consequences:

1. Jumping on the bandwagon – Posting the same opinion that most of your friends are posting. Because they’re cool and you want to be cool too, even though it’s not an original opinion and you probably did not even try to do your own research. This is especially annoying when there’s a crisis/occasion of grief and all some people want to talk about is how SAD all of it is on the Internet, without really caring about it, deep in your heart. Because, what would people think if you did not post about that earthquake/terrorist attack? You have to post SOMETHING! This sort of sharing might actually increase one’s self-perception, because “hey I did express my sadness on social media, there’s nothing else I can/need to do about it,” increasing a sense of having “done” something, without having done anything substantial.

conformity
2. Creating an anti-popular stance – Sometimes when something suddenly goes viral on the Internet, there’s a group of people who are ever-ready to diss it and want it to all stop, because they’re so hep and have found a lesser known counter view point that will let you stand apart on other people’s viral-infected newsfeed. Maybe it makes them feel slightly better than their friends. Your friends are all roped in by the popular opinion, but you.. Oh you are unswayed by such noise. You, have to be different from people, express a different opinion, mark yourself a lion among the sheep! Or a purple cow among normal cows…Purple-Cow

3. Need to be politically correct- This for me, is the most interesting one. It is the ever-existing tension between being nice and not be too uptight about stuff. Is the latest version of Jungle Book problematic due to the disproportional female voices? Wouldn’t it be more politically correct in the 21st century, to develop a version with equal gender representation? I mean, how dare Alphonse Puthren make a movie with a student-teacher romance, a taboo subject, such disrespect towards our guru-worshipping culture! politically correct

Now, while such opinions surely would have existed before social media came along, sharing such opinions online definitely made people aware of the diversity of opinions. Most humans are conformists and want to be perceived as normal. So when an instance of being politically correct (in popular terms being butthurt by stuff) or of letting things go arises, there are people who simply let it go. Others complain and whine about people not being nice and people not embodying the qualities of equality, fraternity and brotherhood in every single thing they do. Sadly, many academics, under the guise of looking for underlying meanings fall into this trend of critiquing stuff, especially art.
Take Game of Thrones for instance. People will be tempted to think of it in feminist, Marxist, sociological lens and critique it — but can we differentiate our opinion from our appreciation for creativity itself? This debate, of whether a piece of writing can be separated from its context/author is a long-standing one in the sphere of literary criticism. I don’t think it’s wrong to think of a work through any of the critical frameworks developed over the years, but what is unfair is to not recognize one’s own intention while doing so. Why is it that we feel the need to make the art we create politically correct? Why is it hard for us to digest a work, written from the perspective of, say, a rapist? Or a pedophile? It is our tendency to be “correct” and not look beyond our little box that makes us hesitant. We see anything that does not represent our empty, idealistic perspective, as trash or “wrong.” I cannot help linking this tendency to the popular use of social media, to share the “right” opinions, to seem “nice,” probably without even understanding what the consequences of such sharing are.

05-blame
This rant is of course not just directed as others, but to myself too. It was not intended to judge or stifle any online habit anyone has. It is just an observation, posted among the zillions of observations posted online. Social media and opinions/organizing using social media has led to many protests and social movements, creating social change. But most of the time, social change for good is far from the real consequences. Next time you voice an opinion on Facebook or Twitter, ask yourself, why do you want to do it? Do you really mean what you’re going to post or did you do it as a part of a trend/to oppose a trend or to be politically correct? Intentions matter. Just something to be aware of and think about. Maybe you’ll realize something you never knew about yourself.

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s